Dunany

Inside Black Lake: have a look!

26 August 2015

If you have attended our latest AGMs you have often heard talk about the Purple Bladderwort (Utricularia Purpurea) in Black Lake. It is a carnivorous plant found in many places in the Eastern part of North America, but only in a very few lakes in the Laurentians. When abundant it can be bothersome but it is otherwise harmless.

This 2,5  minute underwater video was done in the far east section of Black Lake last summer. The author is none other than Dr. Richard Carignan, Quebec’s foremost lake expert. He is also an active member of the GRIL (Group for Interuniversity Research in Limnology and Aquatic Environment)

He has identified in French the plants seen in the video. I am providing you here with the appropriate English names. First, in order of appearance, is  la (Vallisnérie américaine, (Vallisneria Americana),  Brasénie de Schreber,  (Schreber Watershield), Potamot à large feuilles, (Large-Leaved Pondweed)  then lots of Purple Bladderwort. Finally,  a composite of the latter, plus vallisnérie américaine (Tapegrass) and some potamot émergé (Ribbonleaf Pondweed). All of these plants, except the Purple Bladderwort, are common in all our lakes.

 

We do not know how long the Bladderwort  has been living in Black lake. Certainly decades. Maybe centuries. Our expert Richard Carignan, professor at University of Montreal and Quebec’s foremost lake expert, does not recommend any action at this time. But he will follow its evolution with us and advise accordingly.

 

 

6 Responses to “Inside Black Lake: have a look!”

  1. maryse demerson 26 Aug 2015 at 12:47 pm

    wow! très intéressant!

  2. Kathleen Hoelscheron 26 Aug 2015 at 1:09 pm

    very cool! I see some of these when I swim, nice to know their names. Thanks for posting it.

  3. Juneon 26 Aug 2015 at 2:34 pm

    Very interesting! Thanks for the post.

  4. Cathy Riviereon 26 Aug 2015 at 7:43 pm

    This is great , and good to know he will follow up and let us know how things are going and when action should be taken. Wonderful to have this man available to us. Much thanks.

    Cathy

  5. lois Finchon 27 Aug 2015 at 2:16 pm

    A great explanation
    thanks Jacques well done

  6. Monicaon 31 Aug 2015 at 3:59 pm

    Wow, very interesting to see. Aren’t we lucky to have Dr. Carignan’s involvement.
    Now I know what some of the vegetation is called.
    Thanks for all the follow-up.

    Merci Jacques.

    Monica

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